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SPEAKING OF BODIES…

SPEAKING OF BODIES…

TRY THIS QUIZ!

Quick!
Name ten parts of the human body which only have three letters each. (Hint: at least five parts are above the neck and five are below.)

Quiz yourself, then check the answers at right.

To pump up energy in your next training session, make this a competition between groups.
Answers to “Speaking of Bodies…”
Above the neck: Eye, Lip, Ear, Jaw, Gum, Lid, (as in eyelid).
Below the Neck: Leg, Arm, Toe, Hip, Rib.
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GUILA BRINGS THE KITE METHOD TO HUNDREDS IN OCTOBER

GUILA BRINGS THE KITE METHOD TO HUNDREDS IN OCTOBER

Guila Muir is a featured speaker at two large conferences in October:
  • International Association of Experiential Education
  • North American Simulation and Gaming Association

Now, many more SMEs will be able to take flight!

Find out about how the Kite Method helps you create active, intriguing workshops and seminars.

DESIGNATE A “DEVIL’S ADVOCATE” FOR YOUR MEETINGS

DESIGNATE A “DEVIL’S ADVOCATE” FOR YOUR MEETINGS

The New York Times quotes Kevin Lofton, CEO of Catholic Health Initiatives, about an innovative role for one meeting member:

“In our senior management meetings, we appoint a designated devil’s advocate. So if we’re discussing a critical issue, we’ll appoint someone–and the role rotates–to be the devil’s advocate, no matter what their personal point of view is. That helps us avoid groupthink.”
The next time your group makes a high-stakes decision, try this out. Then write to me and let me know how it goes!

WHAT PEOPLE LOVE ABOUT “INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN THAT SOARS”

“The Kite Method will help anyone become a great trainer, developing and delivering training that is active, energetic, and fun.” Kate Williams
Instructional Design That Soars Book
Hundreds of professionals like you use Guila’s book to develop active, relevant training sessions. Colleges and universities across the U.S. use it as a textbook and a faculty guide. Buy it now.

How Do You Know They Know? Evaluating Adult Learning

How can you evaluate training effectiveness? “Happy Sheets” don’t go far. Outcome-based evaluations meet criteria in Kirkpatrick’s evaluation model.

Learn more about evaluating adult learning

Mature students learning computer skills

How Do You Know They Know? Evaluating Adult Learning

by Guila Muir
info@guilamuir.com

I con­tinue to be sur­prised at the use of “Happy Sheets” as eval­u­a­tion tools in train­ing. Beyond let­ting the trainer know if he or she was loved and if the room was too cold, what else do they tell us?

In 1959, Don­ald Kirk­patrick devel­oped his famous model of train­ing eval­u­a­tion. Since then, it has pro­vided basic guide­lines to assess learn­ing. Experts have found that 85% or more of all train­ing pro­grams use “Happy Sheets,” which reveal noth­ing about actual learn­ing. And because data is much harder to col­lect and attribute directly to the train­ing the deeper you go, fewer than 10% of train­ing pro­grams use a Level 4 evaluation.

Level

Issue

Ques­tion Answered

Tool

1

Reac­tion

How Well Did They Like The Course? Rat­ing Sheets

2

Learn­ing

How Much Did They Learn? Tests, Sim­u­la­tions

3

Behav­ior

How Well Did They Apply It To Work? Per­for­mance Measures

4

                  Results What Return Did The Train­ing Invest­ment Yield? Cost-Benefit Analy­sis (Return on Investment)

Outcome-Based Eval­u­a­tions

By cre­at­ing and using an eval­u­a­tion based on the course’s learn­ing out­comes, you may get closer to an hon­est answer to the ques­tion, How Do You Know They Know? which is eval­u­a­tion at Level 2 of Kirkpatrick’s model. Typ­i­cally, the outcome-based eval­u­a­tion would ask par­tic­i­pants to rate their own abil­ity to per­form the learn­ing out­come, as in the fol­low­ing example:

As a result of this train­ing, please rate your abil­ity to do the fol­low­ing action from 1 (“I can’t do this at all”) to 5 (“I feel totally con­fi­dent doing this”): “I can explain at least five fea­tures of the Get Fit pro­gram with­out using notes.”

In many cases, the outcome-based eval­u­a­tion would also ask the par­tic­i­pant to list or explain those five features–in this way, act­ing as a test.

Keep in mind that unless you ask addi­tional ques­tions, you are still sim­ply col­lect­ing data on your par­tic­i­pants’ per­cep­tions of their own learn­ing. Sadly, those per­cep­tions of learn­ing are usu­ally much higher imme­di­ately after the train­ing ses­sion than a few days or weeks later. This is why follow-up train­ing and rein­force­ment is so important.

Nonethe­less, using an Outcome-Based Eval­u­a­tion can pro­vide infor­ma­tion on:

  • Per­for­mance issues about which the par­tic­i­pants feel less confident.
  • Issues you could improve or clar­ify for the next round of training.

All of this data is valu­able to you as you (1) improve the class itself, and (2) fol­low the par­tic­i­pants into the work­place to observe and sup­port them. We invite you to down­load free exam­ples of Out­come Based Eval­u­a­tions from Guila’s book, Instruc­tional Design That Soars.

Get your participants involved with this tip

A great article about how to get people involved immediately in your training sessions and presentations:  What is a hook?  Keep you presentations exciting, engaging, active with Guila Muir’s Kite Method of Instructional Design. Instructional Design That Soars is the textbook of choice when learning how to develop presentations, webinars, classes that will inspire your students.iStock_000013091322XSmall-256x300

These characteristics can be developed through attitude, habit and discipline

instructional design qualities

If you are an emerging leader, read more about the mind-set of these phrases.

You don’t need a certificate in instructional design to create great classes.

Instructional Design That Soars: Kite Method of Designing Classes

You don’t need a certificate in instructional design to create great classes. The Kite Method makes it easy. http://ow.ly/vKi7A71XkqAZsd-L

Three Tips for Course Design

Three Tips for Course Design


If you’re serious about designing a state-of-the-art course for adults, keep these simple guidelines in mind.

Design your course so that it is:


Activity-based, not materials-based.
Problem-posing, not answer-giving.
A smorgasbord, not a one-dish meal.

variety

Develop programs and courses that engage the learner

talkinghead

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